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Archive for September, 2018

5 Study Habits to Help Your Child Succeed this School Year

After the first couple of days and weeks of school, the excitement of back-to-school fades away and homework and studying begin.  This is especially the case for middle and high school students who receive increased homework and learn about their first tests and due dates approaching.

Parents often ask our tutors’ advice on how to succeed during the school year.  Of course knowledge of the English, Math, Science, Social Science and French curriculum is important, but an overlooked item is having strong study habits.  Fortunately our tutors have complied a list of 5 study habits to help your child succeed this school year.

1) Develop Strong Organizational Skills:  Using an agenda, having an organized study space and keeping papers and binders organized is a great start.  For more organization tips, click here

2) Have a Good Study Space: From our experience, a clean, well lit space with school supplies close by works best.  Also, try and avoid distractions like cell phones and TV to allow your child to stay focused.

3) Build Strong Exam and Test taking Strategies:  Making study notes, avoid cramming and asking for help are several way to ensure success on any test or exam.  For further tips, click here

4) Develop Note Taking Skills:  Students should work towards developing note taking strategies that work well with their style and are able to summarize the material and capture all the key points.  For more detailed strategies click here

5) Be Positive and Well Rested:  Having a good nights sleep, eating well and being positive is key to any students success.  Encourage positive thinking and work with your child to re-frame any challenges into positive learning experiences.

Posted in: Parent Education Resources

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SHAD 2019 – Summer Enrichment Opportunity

SHAD is a summer enrichment program where high potential high school students spend 4-weeks in July living at a host university campus outside their hometown and engage in experiential learning in STEAM & Entrepreneurship. It’s an opportunity for promising students to meet like-minded peers, explore Canada and gain an immersive university experience. Participation in SHAD is recognized by university admissions & scholarship providers. Students walk away transformed, empowered to make a difference and with a lifelong network.

Who can apply? SHAD looks for students who are: creative, involved in their community and keen learners. Application for SHAD 2019 are open and due by November 19, 2018.

Can my student afford it? A range of bursaries are available, ensuring that the program is accessible to students with demonstrated financial need. Last year, SHAD gave away over $1 million in bursaries to ensure that the cost of the program is never the reason a student does not apply.

Where can I get more info? Contact Jess Tang, Outreach Lead at jess@shad.ca to receive promotional materials for your school.

Posted in: Math Tutoring, Science Tutoring

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Toronto ADHD Workshops – Fall 2018

This fall the Springboard Clinic are offering two group resources, with a focus on supporting partners and parents of individuals diagnosed with ADHD.

1) Finding Joy in your ADHD Relationship:  
A Workshop for Partners of Individuals with Focusing Challenges/ADHD

Relationships where one partner has ADHD can be deeply challenging. Join the Springboard Clinic for a supportive evening of discussion to learn about how ADHD symptoms can affect both individuals within a relationship, identify typical relational patterns, and explore effective communication strategies with the goal of decreasing conflict and strengthening connection in your relationship. The workshop offers a space to express and be heard with other individuals who are partners with someone with ADHD, psychoeducation on ADHD and relationships, and an opportunity to consider your own relationship through a new lens.

DATE & TIME: October 16th, 2018  6:30pm – 8:30pm
VENUE: Springboard Clinic, 1055 Yonge Street, Suite 304
FACILITATORS: Patricia Thompson, CPCC, and Emily Kedar, M.Ed, from Springboard Clinic

2) Springboard Online Parent Workshop:
A Two Evening Mini-Series with Laura MacNiven

Springboard Clinic’s Laura MacNiven is hosting a two session online mini-series for parents of ADHD children. In two 60 minute sessions, she will walk you through strategies like “being an ADHD detective, 5 steps to mindful parenting and picking battles before you need to”.

Offering an opportunity to take stock of where you are, and think about where you are going, these two sessions are designed to help you find new energy and a clearer headspace to take back to your everyday parenting. Multiple family members are encouraged to participate, and this content is suitable for parents with children of all ages.

Note: Please set aside 60 minutes to do some reflective work in between the two sessions.

DATE & TIME: Session #1: November 15, 2018  8:00pm; Session #2 : November 22, 2018  8:00pm
VENUE: Online through Ontario Telemedicine Network (www.otn.ca)
FACILITATOR: Springboard’s Director, Laura MacNiven, M. Ed

To learn more about the events, click here

Posted in: Special Education Tutoring

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What To Do If Your Child Is Struggling with Reading

Kids develop at their own time, so take a deep breath and try to assess the situation. Ask yourself, Does my child just need a little more time? Or is my child struggling with learning to read?

Some children end up reading a little later than others—and sometimes when they do begin reading, it almost seems as though they learned overnight! Other children may require extra support and you’ll need to advocate for them.

These tips will help you navigate this delicate situation, without panicking,  by providing support for your child.

Reduce (some) screen time: Devices can be a wonderful tool to learn but when children are on screens they usually aren’t engaging in conversation. Considering reducing non-educational screen time by using a timer or a schedule—be sure everyone in the family reduces their usage so your child doesn’t feel singled out. 

Be open to different kinds of texts: Introduce a variety of text types— comics, joke books, magazines, and more, are all wonderful options to hook struggling readers. 

Try reading online: Reading apps can help engage children who aren’t yet reading. Several offer learn-to-read activities as well as highlighted text and text-to-speech capabilities. We enjoy Ooka Island and Epic! 

Play games: A family game night with board or card games helps get children talking, asking questions, and using descriptive language. 

Speak to the teacher: Set up an interview with your child’s teacher. They’ll share their observations and assessments, providing further insight into the situation, and if needed, the teacher can take the steps to set up further testing and in-school support. 

Permission to give up: Children need to know that they don’t have to like every book they read. Help them understand the difference between struggling to read the book and giving up from frustration, to putting down a book that they aren’t enjoying. 

Keep up the bedtime stories: Read with your child on a daily basis, if possible. While you may get tired of reading the same books, embrace rereading favourite books. Repetitive reading helps children’s vocabulary grow and deepens their comprehension. 

Ask for further support: Lean on the expertise of others to provide reading support. This help can come from teachers, family members, homework clubs and professional tutors.

Posted in: English Tutoring

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5 Secrets To A Successful Start To High-School

Starting high-school can be challenging—whether walking through the doors for the first time or starting a new grade—but with regular check-ins and a strong routine that encourages independence, the transition can be a great learning experience.

Here are a few strategies, straight from our tutors, that’ll ensure a successful (and not-too-stressful) start:

Improve note-taking strategies: Developing great note-taking skills can help high-schoolers maximize their academic results and serve as invaluable references when studying. Our team of OCT-certified tutors shared these fourteen organizational strategies that every teen should try to use this school year. 

Plan to get enough sleep: According to Rebecca Earl from Sugar Plum Sleep, “As children reach adolescence, their sleep patterns will naturally start to shift later. That’s because the release of melatonin, the hormone that helps us feel drowsy, is released later in the day.” Teenagers need at least 8-10 hours of sleep per night, so chat with your teen about their school schedule, extra-curricular and social activities and help them plan a bedtime that reflects the sleep they need.

Use an agenda: Carve out time to sit with your teen to review upcoming homework assignments, important academic dates (e.g., tests, exams etc.) and extra-curricular activities.  Revisit this process every month or so to ensure the agenda is up to date! 

Manage the electronics: Set up an electronic docking station in a central area in your home. Set expectations for every one in the house to leave their electronics there during homework, family time, and to leave them docked at bedtime so they can have a proper rest. 

Set academic goals: September is the perfect time to set goals for the year ahead. Review last year’s report card with your teen and help them set 3-4 goals—1 for the short term, 1 for the end of first term, and another 1-2 for the entire year. Once they’ve been set, break out the agenda and help them organize mini-goals to achieve them.

Posted in: Parent Education Resources

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